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Hooray for National Dog Day

by | Events | 0 comments

What’s it all about?

For anyone not aware of it, this and every year, August 26 is National Dog Day. If it hasn’t already been pencilled into your calendar, I suggest you do it now before you forget. At the very least it might act as an aide-mémoire for 2022.

National Dog Day was founded in 2004 by American pet and lifestyle guru, Colleen Paige. A renowned animal rescue advocate, August 26 relates to the date Colleen’s family adopted their first dog Sheltie when Colleen herself was just 10 years old. The event clearly left a lasting impression on her. Much of her life ever since has been spent championing the cause of abandoned dogs across the world.

NDD celebrates all dogs

According to the official website, National Dog Day “celebrates all dogs, mixed breed and pure. Our mission is to help galvanize the public to recognize the number of dogs that need to be rescued each year and acknowledges family dogs and dogs that work selflessly each day to save lives, keep us safe and bring comfort. Dogs put their lives on the line every day… for personal protection, for law enforcement, for the disabled, for our freedom and safety by detecting bombs and drugs and pulling victims of tragedy from wreckage, now they’re detecting cancer and seizures… things even humans cannot do.”

In the UK alone, it is estimated that some 130,000 dogs each year are left with rehoming charities. That number is simply appalling.

Behavioural problems?

While it’s said that behavior problems are the most common reason for dogs being put up for adotion, we at The Dog Chef think the problem is more fundamental than that. We believe that dog ownership in the UK is too simple. Too easy. It should not be so easy to take control of the life of another sentient being without some kind of vetting or training.

How many of those rescue dogs don’t actually have behavioural problems at all, but are simply hapless pups put into situations which do not suit their breed or temperament?

Sadly, too many pet parents take on a dog simply because they like the look of that particular breed. Without any knowledge of that breed’s traits, or regard to the individual dog’s natural instincts and requirements.

With respect, it’s not a behavioural problem with the dog. It’s a poor decision on behalf of the owner!

Support dog rehoming

That aside, please support your local dog rehoming centre on National Dog Day before investing in a high-priced puppy. There are so many dogs out there just looking for the right home. Give a dog a second chance on this most important of days!

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